French Bulldog

  • French Bulldogs
  • French Bulldog
  • French Bulldog Dogs
  • French Bulldog Puppies
  • French Bulldogs in the UK
  • French Bulldog Dog
  • French Bulldog in the UK
  • French Bulldogs in Great Britain
  • French Bulldog Puppy
  • French Bulldog in Great Britain

Utility Group

Size:
Grooming:
Exercise Level:
Trainability:
Barking Level:
Good with Children:
Good with other pets:
Affectionate:
Protective:
Height: 25 - 30cm M | 25 - 30cm F
Weight: 10 - 13kg M | 10 - 13kg F
Life Expectancy: 13 - 15 Years

Searching for a French Bulldog?


The French Bulldog is an affectionate and spirited dog breed known for its wrinkly face and bat-like ears. This dog breed was crossed between terriers and pugs. Despite their gloomy look, French Bulldogs are actually adorable, alert and comical companion dogs. This temperament makes them one of the favourite family pet dogs. They sport a short coat that is easy to groom, which also means minimal shedding. The French Bulldog’s average lifespan is 11 to 14 years.

Are you thinking of owning a French Bulldog? Here is a brief background of this comical bat-eared Bulldog.


book icon History

The French Bulldog originated in England from early Bulldogs that were used for bull baiting. It was the toy-size version of the dogs that were later bred as companions after the sport was banned in the 1835. When lace workers migrated to France, they brought with them their miniature Bulldogs. The popularity of these dogs led to a trade where breeders in England sent over Bulldogs considered faults like those that were too small or with erect ears.

The small type eventually became an official breed and was called Bouledogue Francais. As the breed further diverged away from its roots, it is said that the French Bulldogs were crossed with terriers and pugs.


comb icon Appearance and Grooming

Frenchies are sturdy and compact dogs with distinctive bat ears. They weigh 20 to 28 pounds and stand 11 to 12 inches tall at the withers. They have a square head with slightly flat skull between the ears. Their neck is powerful and thick, and mouth slightly undershot.

The French Bulldog has a short, smooth and shiny coat. Its skin is loose, soft and wrinkled especially at the head and shoulders. The colours accepted by The Kennel Club are brindle, fawn and pied. Whites are classified with pieds during shows. Any whites should be clear with no spots. Grooming is quite easy since its coat only needs occasional brushing. Bathing can also be done once a month or as needed. Make sure to regularly wipe its face to keep its wrinkles and mouth clean as it has a tendency to drool.

Oral hygiene is also important. Make sure to brush the teeth regularly to prevent halitosis or bad breath. Regular brushing will also help reduce plaque and possibility of gum disease. Monthly nail clipping is also part of grooming a Frenchie. If the dog is sensitive to clipping, you might need to bring it to the vet.


bulb icon Temperament and Intelligence

The French Bulldog is an adorable, alert, loving, and comical companion. It prefers to be always by its owner’s side, whether playing or lazing around. Since it requires close human contact, it tends to have separation anxiety when left alone for long periods. Because it is an easy-going pooch that rarely barks, it does really well in apartments. It gets along with children especially if they are raised together. Although they are friendly by nature, some can get territorial and would bicker with other dogs. Like most Bulldogs, Frenchies are accompanied by snorting, snuffling and flatulence.

French Bulldogs are smart and could retain information really well. However, there are times they choose to follow their free-thinking and stubborn nature. Training can be easier when it is done in the form of games and paired with a lot of food and praises. They definitely love to be the centre of attention and please their owners.

Several factors affect the behaviour of dogs. What comes into play is the nature versus nurture debate, which is also applicable to dogs. All dog breeds have their common traits and predispositions attributed to its genes and ancestry. However, a dog’s personal experiences such as early socialisation and training are also considerable influences to shaping a dog’s personality and behaviour.


food icon Nutrition and Feeding

A typical serving for an adult Frenchie is 1 to 1.5 cups of excellent quality dry dog food per day. The amount of food and feeding frequency depend on various factors like age, size, build, activity level, and metabolism. Always do your research about the breed and ask for tips regarding nutrition from your trusted veterinarian.

Typical calorie needs of adult French Bulldog per day:

  • Senior and less active: up to 470 calories daily
  • Typical adults: up to 580 calories daily
  • Physically active/working dogs: up to 920 calories daily

Provide your French Bulldog with food rich in high-quality meat. Although some can be hyperactive, Frenchies don’t necessarily need much protein as other active breeds. About 25% of its overall diet coming from animal meat (lamb, beef and bison) will suffice. Check if your dog can tolerate chicken. This breed is prone to skin allergies and gas so make sure carbs come from complex plan sources. Low-quality fillers like soy and corn not only cause allergies, but aggravate farting. Omega fatty acids are important to maintain a healthy coat.


stethoscope icon Health and Exercise

French Bulldogs are generally healthy but predisposed to certain health issues. These include Hip Dysplasia, Brachycephalic Syndrome, Patellar Luxation, Hemivertebrae, Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD), and Von Willebrand's Disease. They are also inclined to have food allergies, cleft palate, and elongated soft palate.

This breed does not require a lot of exercise. Since it could not regulate its temperature effectively, its exercise regimen should only be composed of 30-minute walks in a cool weather. It is important to monitor them during warm days and provide them with fresh clean water to avoid heat stroke.


pound icon Cost of Ownership

French Bulldogs are considered among the most expensive dog breeds priced at approximately £2,370 for a puppy. That is a one-time cost for initial purchase but other than the money to buy a Frenchie, costs in raising it over a 14-year lifespan takes careful financial planning.

What are other costs involved in owning and raising a French Bulldog? Here are the following estimates per year:

  • Food - £180 - £350
  • Pet Insurance - £100 - £300
  • Vet Fees - £100 - £200
  • Grooming - £200
  • Toys and Treats - £120

For other one-time costs, neutering will cost around £160 and microchip which is about £20. However, since French Bulldogs are easy to groom, you might be able to save more if you do it yourself at home.


Is a French Bulldog Right for You?

  • Frenchies are small and sturdy with a wrinkly face and bat-like ears.
  • They have sleek and easy-to-care coat that sheds less.
  • French Bulldogs are not much of a barker.
  • They require minimal exercise.
  • They snort, snore, and slobber – typical on a short-faced dog.
  • They don’t require much space so a city apartment can be enough.

Are you sure the French Bulldog is the best breed for you? Take the Pet Breed Selector Quiz to find your perfect breed match.

Dog Breed Selector Quiz

Do you think you can tolerate a Frenchie’s snoring? If you’re unsure and looking for other small dog breeds, take our Pet Finder for other suggestions.

Disclaimer:
The information, including measurements, prices and other estimates, on this page is provided for general reference purposes only.

Latest Articles for French Bulldog

Common French Bulldog Health Problems
Common French Bulldog Health Problems
Common French Bulldog Health Problems

5th Feb 2019

Reading Time: 4 minutes

The French Bulldog, also referred to as the ‘Frenchie’, can be perfect canine companions. They have the innate ability to make people laugh; hence, they are also often called clown dogs. The French Bulldogs have taken the Labrador Retriever’s spot as the UK’s most popular dog breed.

Bulldog Breeds Guide 101
Bulldog Breeds Guide 101
Bulldog Breeds Guide 101

27th Dec 2018

Reading Time: 5 minutes

With their wrinkled face and black round eyes, bulldogs have a distinctive look. People usually think that all bulldogs are the same, but there are actually quite a number of bulldog breeds,. Each of them is built differently.

How to Choose the Best French Bulldog Puppy?
How to Choose the Best French Bulldog Puppy?
How to Choose the Best French Bulldog Puppy?

11th Aug 2018

Reading Time: 4 minutes

In recent years, the French bulldog has become a popular craze around the world, especially New York. It may be from the influence of prominent celebrities such as Leonardo DiCaprio, Lady Gaga, and more who flaunt their French bulldog in social media.

French Bulldogs: Why Are They Becoming So Popular?
French Bulldogs: Why Are They Becoming So Popular?
French Bulldogs: Why Are They Becoming So Popular?

27th Apr 2018

Reading Time: 4 minutes

The French Bulldog is rising quickly up the ranks of UK’s most favourite dogs in the last 3 years. It appears set to nudge the Labrador Retriever off the top spot as the nation’s most popular pooch. While this is welcome news for Frenchie fans, this has raised concerns among animal welfare institutions. There is the question of whether the dog was chosen for its looks over its suitability to the owner’s lifestyle.

Listings for French Bulldog

4
French Bulldog Needs Rehomeing French Bulldog Needs Rehomeing
French Bulldog Needs Rehomeing

Gillingham, Kent 14th Oct 2019 Dogs

600

1
Lilac And Tan Boy Carrying Testable Chocolate Lilac And Tan Boy Carrying Testable Chocolate
Lilac And Tan Boy Carrying Testable Chocolate

Pudsey, West Yorkshire 14th Oct 2019 Dogs

1,200

5
Stunning Litter Of French Bulldog Stunning Litter Of French Bulldog
Stunning Litter Of French Bulldog

Sedbergh, Cumbria 14th Oct 2019 Dogs

1,500

7
French Bulldog Puppies For Sale French Bulldog Puppies For Sale
French Bulldog Puppies For Sale

Largs, Ayrshire 14th Oct 2019 Dogs

1,300

Pet Magazine

UKPets quarterly e-magazine

Let's Talk About Pets

Subscribe now to get it for FREE

Pet Magazine