• Goldendoodle in Great Britain
  • Goldendoodle Dogs
  • Goldendoodles in Great Britain
  • Goldendoodles
  • Goldendoodle
  • Goldendoodle Puppy
  • Goldendoodle Dog
  • Goldendoodle Puppies
  • Goldendoodle in the UK
  • Goldendoodles in the UK
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Good with Children:
Good with other pets:
Affectionate:
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Height: 61 - 66cm M | 56 - 58cm F
Weight: 14 - 45kg M | 14 - 45kg F
Life Expectancy: 10 - 15 Years

Looking for a Goldendoodle?


Introduction

Goldendoodle or Groodle is a Golden Retriever and Poodle cross-breed. He has been around since the 1960s, and he first appeared in the United States. The very first one was bred as a hypoallergenic guide dog for a blind person whose close family member was allergic to dog hair.

The Goldendoodle is not a fully fledge breed, there are no breed standards for the breed, and he is not officially categorised in any of the ten dog breed groups.

Goldendoodle is a playful, family-oriented dog that does not want to miss out on all the fun. He is a friendly dog, which makes him unfit to be a guard dog. In training, he can quickly learn new commands since he is highly intelligent and eager to please his master.

Although the Groodle sheds minimally, he needs to be groomed regularly and would benefit from clipping to maintain a neat coat. As an active Poodle mix breed, he will not be content in an apartment setting, especially without his daily exercises needs being met.


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History

Goldendoodle is said to have been bred in 1969 by Monica Dickens. In the 1990s, breeders crossed a Golden Retriever with a standard Poodle in Australia and North America. The purpose was to develop a guide dog for a blind person whose close family member was allergic to dog hair.

Since the Golden Retriever has been bred as a guide dog and the Poodle is considered hypoallergenic, combining the two sounded promising. Since 2005, the Goldendoodle, especially the Mini Goldendoodle, has become popular not just as a pet but as a guide dog, therapy dog, search and rescue dog, service dog, and sniffer dog.

The Groodle remains a designer Poodle-mix breed and is still not truly a breed in his own right. Like most cross-breeds, his appearance, size, and temperament can be unpredictable. Unlike multigeneration crossing of purebreds where standards are set, in cross-breeds, there is no guarantee which characteristics from the parent breeds will be more dominant.


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Appearance and Grooming

The Goldendoodle breed has no standard sizes, colours, coat types, and overall appearance. Amid the differences, one thing is for sure—he is adorable and cuddly. Responsible breeders and enthusiasts are aiming to breed healthy dogs that have a consistent appearance and disposition.

How big do Goldendoodles get?

There are three size variations for the Goldendoodle: standard, medium, and miniature Goldendoodles.

  • The standard Goldendoodle stands a maximum of 66 centimetres in height and weighs about 45 kilos.
  • The medium Goldendoodle measures a maximum of 56 centimetres tall and weighs around 25 kilos.
  • The miniature Goldendoodle, which is a cross between a toy or a miniature Poodle, can grow up to 56 centimetres in height and weighs at least 14 kilos.

Do Goldendoodles shed?

Most Goldendoodles have low- to non-shedding coats that are hypoallergenic. Their hair is longer on the ears, body, tail, and legs, and shorter on the head and muzzle.

Goldendoodle dog's most common colours are white, gold, cream, chocolate, coffee, apricot, red, black, sandy brown, and grey. His coat type varies, as some of them have tight and curly coats, whilst others have silky straight and flat coats. Puppies from the same litter can differ widely in colour and coat.

Even though he sheds minimally, the Groodle still needs to be groomed regularly to ensure that his coat remains healthy and clean. For Goldendoodle owners opting to keep the coat in a natural state, brushing should be done at least once or twice a week. Brushing and trimming the fur on his feet is required every two weeks.

Bathing the Goldendoodle can be done as needed to retain the natural oils of the coat. Make sure that his nails are trimmed, ears are cleaned, and skin free from ticks and fleas.

To build strong teeth as well as avoid bad breath and gum issues, brush the Groodle's teeth regularly and provide appropriate chew toys.


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Temperament and Intelligence

Are Goldendoodles a good dog?

Goldendoodles have inherited many positive characteristics from their parent breeds, which is why these cross Poodles are a popular choice as family pets.

This Poodle cross dog is known to be gentle, affectionate, intelligent, and loyal. The Goldendoodle loves being surrounded by his family and being involved in their activities.

Do Goldendoodles bark a lot?

The Groodle rarely barks and may not even make a sound if someone is at the door. Due to his over-friendly personality, he is not an ideal guard dog.

This designer dog is friendly and patient towards children and gets along with other dogs and small animals. However, always make sure that the interactions do not get too rowdy to prevent anybody from getting accidentally hurt.

Early socialisation is important in helping the Goldendoodle become outgoing and confident in the presence of other people and animals. He is easy to train, as the breed is highly intelligent and eager to please.

As the Goldendoodle is a smart dog that also learns undesirable behaviours, ground rules need to be established with firm yet gentle methods. He is sensitive and would not respond well to harshness, so use positive reinforcements in training. He will appreciate rewards through treats and lots of praises.

As an active breed, the Goldendoodle is not the best breed choice for apartment living with no access to a fenced garden, even for the mini Goldendoodle.

A house with a spacious and securely-fenced garden would be the ideal home setting for him. But it is not advised to keep Groodle outside the house or in a kennel, as he is a people-oriented dog that craves attention from his family members. He is also prone to have separation anxiety.


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Nutrition and Feeding

For an adult Goldendoodle a typical serving with a dry dog food diet is one to four cups per day; however, the exact amount of food and frequency of feeding depends on his age, size, build, activity level, and metabolism.

Expect a different food serving for the standard, the medium, and the miniature Goldendoodles. Here are the typical calorie needs per day of a standard adult weighing 18 - 22 kilograms:

  • Senior and less active: up to 1,020 calories daily
  • Typical adult: up to 1,270 calories daily
  • Physically active/working dog: up to 1,400 calories daily

Since this Poodle cross-breed tends to be on the smaller size, he can develop bone and joint issues. Owners are recommended to provide their Goldendoodles with food and supplements containing vitamins and minerals that support their joints.

Whether your Goldendoodle dog is on commercial or home-made dog food, you need to make sure that it contains red meat, poultry, fruits, and vegetables. It should also be easily digestible to avoid bloat, which is a disease that he can inherit from his Golden Retriever parent.


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Health and Exercise

How long do Goldendoodles live?

Goldendoodle dog can live for 10 - 15 years on average. When bred by responsible breeders, he is generally healthy but predisposed to a few health issues. He can develop the following illnesses:

The Goldendoodle is a high-energy dog, so he needs daily exercise that is both physically and mentally stimulating. He can be overly hyperactive if he is unable to release his energy. He needs at least forty to sixty minutes of exercise, which can be divided into two.

The exercise can be in the form of walks, runs, as well as free time and games in a fenced garden. Make sure that your fence is secure or the Groodle will take advantage and escape. Since he loves the water, swimming is also a great form of exercise for him.


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Cost of Ownership

How much are Goldendoodles?

If you are set on caring for a Standard Goldendoodle, or a Mini Goldendoodle, be ready to pay £800 or more for a well-bred Goldendoodle puppy. You will likely spend £40 to £50 for his dog food. The initial cost for dog accessories and equipment can cost up to £200. These include food bowls, lead, collar, dog bed, and crate.

Veterinary expenses such as routine checks and annual boosters can have a combined cost of £1000 for the first year.

Getting a pet insurance for a Groodle will cost you around £20 for a basic cover or £45 for a lifetime one. These prices vary depending on your Goldendoodle's health, age, the type of cover that you will choose, and whether he has pre-existing conditions.

Roughly, you will be setting aside £70 to £100 a month for recurring expenses depending on the type of insurance cover that you will choose for your Goldendoodle. This is exclusive of the type of pet insurance policy that you will purchase and other expenses such as dog walking service or dog day-care.


Goldendoodle Breed Highlights

  • Goldendoodle is a mixed breed that inherited the good disposition of his parent breeds, making him a great pet companion.
  • The adult size of a Goldendoodle puppy can be tricky since there are no breed standards.
  • Goldendoodle is an intelligent pooch that can be easily trained, but make sure to set rules to avoid bad behaviour.
  • He is patient towards children and friendly to everybody, humans and animals alike.
  • He may alert you of intruders, but he will warmly welcome them as well!
  • Goldendoodle may have a hypoallergenic hair with minimal shedding, but he needs to be groomed, especially clipped, regularly.
  • As an active dog that requires forty to sixty minutes of exercise, Goldendoodle is not suited for apartment living with no access to a fenced yard.
Goldendoodle

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Disclaimer:
The information, including measurements, prices and other estimates, on this page is provided for general reference purposes only.